Hokkien Word Meanings?

Discussions on the Hokkien (Minnan) language.
jilang
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 4:28 am

Hokkien Word Meanings?

Post by jilang »

Hi

I've heard a couple of words in some Hokkien songs that I would like to know the meaning of. If you know them could you please tell me the meaning?

1) hiong hiong ciann cai iann. - I think the "ciann cai iann" just means "really knows" but I don't know what "hiong hiong" means.

2) ling sing

Thanks

~Jilang

ong
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:04 am

Post by ong »

it means suddenly

ong
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:04 am

Post by ong »

ling-sing 灵性 spiritualism

duaaagiii
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 8:17 am

Post by duaaagiii »

Other possibilities:

hiong5 hiong5 ciah4 cai1 iann2 - suddenly found out / realized
lin5 (or jin5) sing1 (人生) - life

jilang
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Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 4:28 am

Post by jilang »

Thank you ong and duaaagiii!

For you other possibilities, duaaagiii, I thought 人 was pronounced lang5? And what would that ciah mean?

Thanks

SimL
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Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:33 am
Location: Amsterdam

Post by SimL »

Hi Jilang,

I think with "ciah4" duaaagiii means the Malay/Penang Hokkien "ba3-lu2" (only, just, recently), which I mentioned in a recent posting.

"i1 ciah8-lai3" (= he's only just recently arrived).

A slightly different use is in this example: "i1 khuann3--tioh8 e7-si5 ciah8-e7 cai1" (literally: "he sees [it] (possessive, attributive)'s time [he] only/just can know", i.e. "he'll only know when he sees it".

Perhaps another use is: "i1 ciah8-u7 lak4-koo1 (nia3)" (= "he has only six dollars"). I'm not sure of this last usage. In Penang Hokkien, it would be more usual to say "ka3-nia3" for "only", so "i1 ka3-nia3 u7 lak4-koo1".

Sim.

P.S. Please forgive my tones. I'm getting better at them, but it will still be years before I really get them right, because in many cases I don't know the citation (non-sandhi) form of a syllable, so I'm not sure which sandhi-tone it is.

Andrew

Post by Andrew »

SimL wrote:Hi Jilang,

I think with "ciah4" duaaagiii means the Malay/Penang Hokkien "ba3-lu2" (only, just, recently), which I mentioned in a recent posting.

"i1 ciah8-lai3" (= he's only just recently arrived).
I'm not familiar with this usage = Mandarin 剛剛, in Penang would be balu.
A slightly different use is in this example: "i1 khuann3--tioh8 e7-si5 ciah8-e7 cai1" (literally: "he sees [it] (possessive, attributive)'s time [he] only/just can know", i.e. "he'll only know when he sees it".
Or the famous "ai-piann, ciah-e-iann", = Mandarin 才, in Penang would be kah
Perhaps another use is: "i1 ciah8-u7 lak4-koo1 (nia3)" (= "he has only six dollars"). I'm not sure of this last usage. In Penang Hokkien, it would be more usual to say "ka3-nia3" for "only", so "i1 ka3-nia3 u7 lak4-koo1".
Not familiar with this either, =Mandarin 只 , in Penang kan1-na7 or nia7.

jilang
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Dec 16, 2006 4:28 am

Post by jilang »

Hi all

I've never heard of ciah used to mean balu, I've only ever used cim. Thanks for that explanation.

Some other words I've heard in some songs that I don't know:

khi pue
ong su
kai sue

SimL
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Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 8:33 am
Location: Amsterdam

Post by SimL »

Andrew wrote:
SimL wrote: "i1 ciah8-lai3" (= he's only just recently arrived).
I'm not familiar with this usage = Mandarin 剛剛, in Penang would be balu.
Hmmm... perhaps I'm being influenced by my mother's non-Penang Hokkien usage then. Suddenly it doesn't sound very Penang Hokkien to me either.
Andrew wrote:
SimL wrote:Perhaps another use is: "i1 ciah8-u7 lak4-koo1 (nia3)" (= "he has only six dollars"). I'm not sure of this last usage. In Penang Hokkien, it would be more usual to say "ka3-nia3" for "only", so "i1 ka3-nia3 u7 lak4-koo1".
Not familiar with this either, =Mandarin 只 , in Penang kan1-na7 or nia7.
Thanks for correcting my "ka" to "kan" (and the tone). Not being familiar with the hanzi, I can only go by the sound, and there is no real way of distinguishing kan-nia from ka-nia.

Sim.

duaaagiii
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Joined: Sun Feb 25, 2007 8:17 am

Post by duaaagiii »

khi2-pue1 (起飛) - to take flight
ong2-su7 (往事) - the past; bygones
kai2-sueh4 (解說) - to explain

jilang
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Post by jilang »

Thank you duaaagiii.

When I think about it, I already knew khi pue but I would pronounce it differently as "khi per"

And I'd forgotten about kai sueh. Thanks for the reminder.

SimL
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Location: Amsterdam

The word for "kite"

Post by SimL »

When growing up in Penang, the only word I knew for "kite" was "au5". I haven't been able to find this word in Douglas/Barclay. The word in Douglas is "hong1-che1" (non-sandhi tones).

My mother said that "au5" is known in the south of the Malaysian peninsular, but is more common in the north. The usual word in the south is indeed "hong1-che1".

Does anyone know the character for "au5"?

ong
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Post by ong »

No,I am sure it isn't a minnan word.I can speak thai,it is the same with thai language for kite in malay.Somebody change the vowel into au

SimL
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Location: Amsterdam

Post by SimL »

Wow, thanks Ong! I never knew that.

What does the Thai word sound like? I only know "layang-layang" in Malay? Is there another Malay word which sounds like "au"?

Thanks & regards,
Sim.

ong
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 6:04 am

Post by ong »


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