Rice Cooker

Discussions on the Hokkien (Minnan) language.
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aokh1979
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Rice Cooker

Post by aokh1979 » Tue Feb 15, 2011 2:01 pm

Happy Chinese New Year !

I have been teaching "missing" Hokkien words of Penang in Facebook, I plan to collect about 300 words and publish a book. Those are words I hear from older generation but not younger.

Oh, I mean to ask a question about Rice Cooker. Has anyone ever found out how Bòk-Kèng is written ? I have been asking around my China friends and no one seems to know what a Bòk-Kèng is. Do you use it in your variant alongside with Puīnn-Ue ?
Mark Yong
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by Mark Yong » Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:04 am

Definitely. I heard and used the word bòk-khèng in Penang regularly. However, I always knew it in the context of 'tiffin carrier', not 'rice cooker'. Unless the person(s) whom I heard use it were actually mis-using the word. :lol:
SimL
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by SimL » Wed Feb 16, 2011 12:14 am

For me, it was a large cooking pot (holding, say, more than 3-4 litres), typically earthenware/ceramic, but perhaps could be metal/enamel too. There's an additional association of "round-bottomed", so it's really one of those very old-fashioned cooking pots, e.g. for cooking rice for a family of 10 in. However, I don't have aspiration on the second syllable, so "bok-keng" (as aokh has it), not "bok-kheng" (as Mark has it).

A tiffin-carrier was called a(n) "uaN2-can5", in my usage.

Here are some references from google (again, what CAN'T one find on the net these days...). I've included the original quote from each page, so that if the page disappears, the citation is still known here.

http://allenooi.com/page/31/ & http://allenooi.com/2008/08/chong-qing-hot-pot/
"I went to the market to get the fish ball and other ingredients that I like. Since it’s only me and my mum, I cook it by using the normal wok. (Is it call wok? I don’t know how to say “bok keng” in English. Anyone?)"

http://pmaymac.blogspot.com/2009_09_01_archive.html
"It 'Chai Boi' time! After the prayer one week ago, Snoopy bring us some "Chai Boi" cook by Mrs. Snoopy. I tell you, it gooooood. Hehehe..... We all love it. Thank you Mrs. Snoopy for the effort, some more she cook two "bok keng" @ pot (;p) - one with roasted duck and another one without it. TQVM. Mwuah..... mwuah...."

The first link might suggest that the meaning is "wok" (though perhaps the author has 'my' bok-keng in mind, and mistakenly thought it was called a "wok" in English). The second link shows a photo of a very large metal pot, roughly what my image of the word is (though a earthenware/ceramic one is more "architypical" to me). This one has a roundish bottom.

PS: Brilliant initiative aokh! I really look forward to seeing the book when it's ready.
niuc
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by niuc » Wed Feb 16, 2011 6:03 pm

I seldom heard of bok8-khing7 in my variant, usually only in the phrase er/ə1-a2-bok8-khing7 鍋仔[][] to mean cooking pots. I wonder if bok8 there is 木. We usually just say er1 鍋; and 飯鍋 png7-er1 or 電鍋 tian7-er1 for rice cooker.
SimL
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by SimL » Wed Feb 16, 2011 7:58 pm

niuc wrote:I wonder if bok8 there is 木
Hmmm... wouldn't last very long on an open fire :mrgreen:.
niuc
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by niuc » Thu Feb 17, 2011 1:56 am

SimL wrote:Hmmm... wouldn't last very long on an open fire :mrgreen:.
Hahaha! :lol: I meant may be, just may be, bok8-khing7 might originally refer to wooden pots used as containers for food/dishes, much like 飯桶 (literal meaning) or Japanese bento box / wooden bowls, but of course not put on open fire.
SimL
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by SimL » Thu Feb 17, 2011 4:55 am

niuc wrote:
SimL wrote:Hmmm... wouldn't last very long on an open fire :mrgreen:.
Hahaha! :lol: I meant may be, just may be, bok8-khing7 might originally refer to wooden pots used as containers for food/dishes, much like 飯桶 (literal meaning) or Japanese bento box / wooden bowls, but of course not put on open fire.
Oh, good point! Indeed, there have long been wooden bowls and containers for holding food. There's absolutely no reason why the name of an object which started out as only a wooden container for holding food might not have shifted to refer to an object in which the food is cooked in.
Ah-bin
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by Ah-bin » Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:37 pm

The article on Sumatran Hokkien says this is a Malay loan, but I haven't been able to find the original word (for cooking pot) in a Malay dictionary so far.
aokh1979
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by aokh1979 » Thu Mar 03, 2011 2:17 pm

Exactly. I have never heard anyone saying anything that sounds similar in Malay. Frankly, I quite believe that the 1st character is 木 and it just makes so much sense.
Ah-bin
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by Ah-bin » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:32 am

Hôa-î-thong-gú 華夷通語 (p.19b.) has thô•-tiáⁿ 塗鼎 defined as 勿聾仔 (bút-lâng-á) in Malay. There is a circle under the 聾 which indicates "Kái-séh" 解說 meaning kóng-ōa-im (lâng) rather than literary pronunciation (lông).

…looks like they were trying to write “blanga”, which isn't close enough to Bok-keng to be plausible.
Mark Yong
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by Mark Yong » Mon Mar 19, 2012 1:04 pm

How about 木筐 ? The 『國語辭典』 defines as 盛物之方型竹器. Okay, granted the definition specifically states that a is made out of bamboo and is square/rectangular in shape, and does not say anything about cooking with it!

Some pictures I got off the Web:

Image
竹木筐
Last edited by Mark Yong on Thu Mar 22, 2012 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
niuc
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by niuc » Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:34 am

Mark, probably it is! :mrgreen:

Btw how do you say "frame" in your variant? Mine is "khing" 框, usually kìaⁿkhing 鏡框 (photo frame). In Mandarin 框 is usually kuang4, although I also found kuang1 in IME. Hokkien "khing" (T1) is confirmed by 當代泉州音字彙, including the phrase 鏡框. However, 筐 is kuang1 in Mandarin and also "khing" (or "khong") according to 當代泉州音字彙. In my variant, I say bòkkhīng rather than bòkkhing. So the tones of 框 and 筐 in Mandarin and my Hokkien variant seem to be 倒反 in this case, if bòkkhīng is really 木筐.
Mark Yong
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Re: Rice Cooker

Post by Mark Yong » Thu Mar 22, 2012 11:34 am

niuc wrote:
Btw how do you say "frame" in your variant? Mine is "khing" 框, usually kìaⁿkhing 鏡框 (photo frame).
Yup, Penang Hokkien uses kheng1, too. It was one of the first few ‘new’ words that I learnt during my early days in Penang. I first heard it used when I visited an old photo studio down in Georgetown’s Cintra Street (汕頭街 Suaⁿ3 Thau5 Ke1) to have a new set of wooden photo frames custom-made for my great-grandparents’ portraits.
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